LOGO FINAL

Tuesday 14th June

8:45 am

- 8:50 am

In-person

Welcome and Reflections on Day One

Clive Corry

Tuesday 14th June

8:50 am

- 9:00 am

In-person

Opening Remarks – Minister of Health for Northern Ireland

Robin Swann MLA

Tuesday 14th June

9:00 am

- 10:00 am

In-person

The Effect of Trauma on the Next Generation

Rachel Yehuda

There has been much interest in trying to understand whether the effects of trauma are passed down to the next generation, or even subsequent generations. Recent advances in molecular biology and epigenetics have provided paradigms for understanding the long term effects of stress. Epigenetic research in animals has provided models for how such effects might be transmitted and there has been great speculation regarding whether and to what extent such mechanisms can be applied towards understanding some of the enduring effects of trauma in offspring of survivors. This presentation will focus on the consequences of parental trauma and will examine the question of whether such effects are biologically “transmitted.” Most of the research has been conducted on adult children of Holocaust survivors but is supported by observations in children born to pregnant women who survived the world trade centre attack on 9/11. Findings demonstrating epigenetic marks associated with parental trauma effects of PTSD will be reviewed and discussed in the context of whether they represent generational “damage” resulting from adversity or indicate attempts to adapt to environmental challenges to achieve resilience. New information about replication and molecular studies will be presented, and treatment implications discussed.

Learning objectives:
1. To discuss biological mechanisms associated with Epigenetics (including preconception, in utero, and postnatal influences.
2. To discuss intergenerational transmission and risk for psychopathology in offspring.
3. To discuss enduring biological alterations.
4. To examine different models of interpreting intergenerational effects.
5. To discuss the clinical presentation of intergenerational trauma.

Tuesday 14th June

10:00 am

- 10:15 am

In-person

Q & A Session with Rachel Yehuda

Tuesday 14th June

10:15 am

- 10:45 am

Break - Tea, Coffee and Conversations with delegates and exhibitors

Tuesday 14th June

10:45 am

- 12:00 pm

In-person

What We Have Learned in Three Decades of Explorations in Trauma: A New Road Map

Bessel van der Kolk

Helping patients heal from trauma is one of the most challenging things we do. But it becomes infinitely more challenging when your patient is missing one key experience – a stable, secure relationship.
The lack of these steady, caring, attachment relationships can prolong a patient’s suffering after trauma. It can make it more difficult for your client to regulate emotions or build a trusting bond with you so that you can help them heal.
During this presentation, Bessel will look at what we have learned and look at a new road map to help patients recover from trauma.

Tuesday 14th June

12:00 pm

- 12:45 pm

Lunch and Conversations with delegates and exhibitors

Tuesday 14th June

12:45 pm

- 1:45 pm

In-person

Trauma Informed Prisons: From Corrections to Connections.

Fritzi Horstman

Trauma-Informed Prisons. Prisons are ground zero for trauma. When we bring trauma-informed practices to the men and women living and working in prison, we change the culture from one of control and punishment to healing and rehabilitation. With a 66% recidivism rate, prisons aren’t working. 95% of the incarcerated will be returning to society one day, it benefits families and communities to have our citizens returnable to function in society and trauma-informed prisons are the path forward.

Tuesday 14th June

1:45 pm

- 2:00 pm

Q & A Session with Fritzi Horstman

Tuesday 14th June

2:10 pm

- 3:25 pm

In-person

Trauma, Dissociation, and the Brain: Toward the Restoration of the Self

Ruth Lanius

This presentation will discuss treatment challenges frequently encountered in trauma treatment. Therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the self through the resolution of key symptoms and barriers to treatment will be described. Specifically, an integrative
approach drawing on techniques such as EMDR, CBT, DBT, sensorimotor psychotherapy, neurofeedback, and internal family systems therapy will be demonstrated throughout the keynote. Finally, the lecture will discuss brain adaptations frequently observed in the aftermath of trauma.

Tuesday 14th June

3:25 pm

- 3:40 pm

Q & A Session with Ruth Lanius

Tuesday 14th June

3:40 pm

- 4:00 pm

Break - Tea, Coffee and Conversations with delegates and exhibitors

Tuesday 14th June

4:00 pm

- 5:15 pm

Live Stream

The Impact of Trauma and Neglect on the Developing Child

Bruce D. Perry

Presentation Objectives:
1. Understand the effects of trauma and neglect from a neurodevelopmental perspective.
2. Identify signs and symptoms of trauma and neglect in young children.
3. Learn new strategies for care, program development and policy as related to developmental trauma.
The development of a young child is profoundly influenced by experiences. Experiences – good and bad – shape the organization of the brain which ultimately impacts emotional, social, cognitive and physiological functioning. Insights into this process come from understanding brain development. Trauma and neglect, which is the absence of essential developmental experiences required to express the fundamental potential of a child, are both pervasive problems in our culture. Similarly, chaos, threat and abnormal patterns of emotional, social, cognitive and physical interactions with young children lead to an array of brain-related problems with life-long implications for mental and physical health. This presentation will review clinical work and research that can help us better experience and then suggest new directions for clinical practice, program development and policy

Tuesday 14th June

5:15 pm

- 5:30 pm

Live Stream

Q & A Session with Bruce Perry

Tuesday 14th June

5:30 pm

Conference Finish