LOGO FINAL

Monday 13th June

7:45 am

- 9:00 am

Registration opens at 7:45am - Riverside Concourse

Monday 13th June

9:00 am

- 9:10 am

In-person

Welcome and Introduction by Founder & Director of Action Trauma

Clive Corry

Monday 13th June

9:10 am

- 9:20 am

In-person

What can you expect over the two days?

Karen Hamilton

Monday 13th June

9:20 am

- 9:30 am

In-person

Welcome from Gerry Lennon - CEO of Visit Belfast

Gerry Lennon

Monday 13th June

9:30 am

- 10:45 am

In-person

How to Enable Narrative Expression and Affect Regulation - The Scared Gang Are Asked To Tell 

Éadaoin Bhreathnach

When children are asked to recall traumatic events or express their fears, their stress response is activated. Children have different styles of adaptation to threat; instinctive survival behaviour, sensory regulation behaviours and strategic attachment behaviours. Each adaptation needs a corresponding sensory regulating response and an appropriate response by the professional, to enable the child to recover and participate in the narrative process. “The Scared Gang are Asked to Tell” provides a guide to professionals on how to enable narrative expression and affect regulation. Children gain insight into their own instinctive behaviours and learn the use of regulating tools and activities through four Scared Gang stories, culminating in writing a Scared Gang storybook about their own fears and regulating needs. This presentation will cover the basic principles described in this resource and show illustrated examples from children’s personal Scared Gang stories.

Monday 13th June

10:45 am

- 11:15 am

Break - Tea, Coffee and Conversations with delegates and exhibitors

Monday 13th June

11:15 am

- 12:30 pm

In-person

Making Sense Of Other People’s Resistance: Shame, Blame and Fierce Curiosity

Suzanne Zeedyk

Over the past decade, public understanding of the processes of trauma has expanded significantly. However, awareness does not always bring change, which can feel frustrating, confusing and exhausting for campaigners. How can we make sense of such resistance? Why are systems and individuals often reluctant to adjust policy and practice in a way that supports prevention, healing and well-being? Developmental psychologist Dr Suzanne Zeedyk will address these questions by exploring the powerful ways in which shame and blame function to protect people from engaging. She argues that resistance is predictable, and she works to help advocates of trauma-informed practice make sense of this response. Her talk will draw on historic and contemporary examples of change, both of which offer valuable lessons in how best to tackle change for the future. She will share the personal strategy she uses when confronted by resistance: she steps into Fierce Curiosity.

Monday 13th June

12:30 pm

- 1:15 pm

Lunch and Conversations with delegates and exhibitors

Monday 13th June

1:15 pm

- 2:30 pm

Live Stream

Compassionate Inquiry®

Gabor Maté

During this presentation, Dr Maté will present on Compassionate Inquiry and show how individuals can connect to the truth within themselves in the present moment, become free from self-generated suffering and gain insight, clarity and choice in their behaviour.

Compassionate Inquiry® is a psychotherapeutic approach developed by Dr Gabor Maté that reveals what lies beneath the appearance we present to the world. Using Compassionate Inquiry, both the individual and therapist unveil the level of consciousness, mental climate, hidden assumptions, implicit memories and body states that form the real message that words both express and conceal. Through Compassionate Inquiry, the client can recognize the unconscious dynamics that run their lives and how to liberate themselves from them.

“The purpose of Compassionate Inquiry is to drill down to the core stories people tell themselves – to get them to see what story they are telling themselves unconsciously; what those beliefs are, where they came from; and guide them to the possibility of letting go of those stories, or letting go of the hold those stories have on them …

That’s what Compassionate Inquiry is.”

Monday 13th June

2:40 pm

- 3:40 pm

In-person

SE meets Humanual – How Trauma affects Support, Suspension, and Breath including a 15 min Q&A

Betsy Polatin

This keynote is a wonderful opportunity to discover the unity of body, mind, and spirit as you explore the relationship of movement and breath to trauma. I will offer simple exercises to enhance sensory skills by exploring the musculoskeletal, respiratory, and nervous systems, and how they relate to the larger universe, based on the tensegrity model. You will learn to increase body awareness, and breathing capacity, to change inefficient habits, so that you can move with ease and speak with confidence. Learn to awaken inherent potential by finding the support from the ground that can lead to full stature and expansion, while noting how trauma and overwhelm can interfere with this process.

Monday 13th June

3:40 pm

- 3:55 pm

Q&A session with Betsy Polatin

Monday 13th June

3:55 pm

- 4:15 pm

Break - Tea, Coffee and Conversations with delegates and exhibitors

Monday 13th June

4:15 pm

- 5:30 pm

Live Stream

The Impact of Childhood Experiences on Adult's Health and Well-Being

Vincent Felitti

Dr. Felitti is the co-Principal Investigator of the ACE Study. ACE is a major, ongoing, retrospective and prospective study involving over 17,000 middle-class Americans. The study looks at categories of adverse childhood experiences and their relationship to adult health, well-being and social functioning. The Adverse Childhood Effects (ACE) Study has major implications: all patients should be routinely screened for adverse childhood experiences; a childhood trauma history may be very relevant to both serious illness and vague somatic complaints, and appropriate approaches to treatment must include dealing with childhood trauma. Additional data suggest that evaluating patients for ACEs is also cost-effective. According to data collected from over 17,000 Kaiser patients, adverse childhood experiences, though well concealed, are unexpectedly common, have a profound negative effect on adult health and well-being a half-century later, and are a prime determinant of adult health status in the United States.

Monday 13th June

5:30 pm

- 5:45 pm

Q & A Session with Vincent Felitti

The Q&A Session with Dr Felitti may be longer than the 15 mins allocated, however, all delegates are free to leave at any time. Dr Felitti is happy to spend time answering questions that delegates may have.

Monday 13th June

5:45 pm

Day One Finish

Tuesday 14th June

8:45 am

- 8:50 am

In-person

Welcome and Reflections on Day One

Clive Corry

Tuesday 14th June

8:50 am

- 9:00 am

In-person

Opening Remarks – Minister of Health for Northern Ireland

Robin Swann MLA

Tuesday 14th June

9:00 am

- 10:00 am

In-person

The Effect of Trauma on the Next Generation

Rachel Yehuda

There has been much interest in trying to understand whether the effects of trauma are passed down to the next generation, or even subsequent generations. Recent advances in molecular biology and epigenetics have provided paradigms for understanding the long term effects of stress. Epigenetic research in animals has provided models for how such effects might be transmitted and there has been great speculation regarding whether and to what extent such mechanisms can be applied towards understanding some of the enduring effects of trauma in offspring of survivors. This presentation will focus on the consequences of parental trauma and will examine the question of whether such effects are biologically “transmitted.” Most of the research has been conducted on adult children of Holocaust survivors but is supported by observations in children born to pregnant women who survived the world trade centre attack on 9/11. Findings demonstrating epigenetic marks associated with parental trauma effects of PTSD will be reviewed and discussed in the context of whether they represent generational “damage” resulting from adversity or indicate attempts to adapt to environmental challenges to achieve resilience. New information about replication and molecular studies will be presented, and treatment implications discussed.

Learning objectives:
1. To discuss biological mechanisms associated with Epigenetics (including preconception, in utero, and postnatal influences.
2. To discuss intergenerational transmission and risk for psychopathology in offspring.
3. To discuss enduring biological alterations.
4. To examine different models of interpreting intergenerational effects.
5. To discuss the clinical presentation of intergenerational trauma.

Tuesday 14th June

10:00 am

- 10:15 am

In-person

Q & A Session with Rachel Yehuda

Tuesday 14th June

10:15 am

- 10:45 am

Break - Tea, Coffee and Conversations with delegates and exhibitors

Tuesday 14th June

10:45 am

- 12:00 pm

In-person

What We Have Learned in Three Decades of Explorations in Trauma: A New Road Map

Bessel van der Kolk

Helping patients heal from trauma is one of the most challenging things we do. But it becomes infinitely more challenging when your patient is missing one key experience – a stable, secure relationship.
The lack of these steady, caring, attachment relationships can prolong a patient’s suffering after trauma. It can make it more difficult for your client to regulate emotions or build a trusting bond with you so that you can help them heal.
During this presentation, Bessel will look at what we have learned and look at a new road map to help patients recover from trauma.

Tuesday 14th June

12:00 pm

- 12:45 pm

Lunch and Conversations with delegates and exhibitors

Tuesday 14th June

12:45 pm

- 1:45 pm

In-person

Trauma Informed Prisons: From Corrections to Connections.

Fritzi Horstman

Trauma-Informed Prisons. Prisons are ground zero for trauma. When we bring trauma-informed practices to the men and women living and working in prison, we change the culture from one of control and punishment to healing and rehabilitation. With a 66% recidivism rate, prisons aren’t working. 95% of the incarcerated will be returning to society one day, it benefits families and communities to have our citizens returnable to function in society and trauma-informed prisons are the path forward.

Tuesday 14th June

1:45 pm

- 2:00 pm

Q & A Session with Fritzi Horstman

Tuesday 14th June

2:10 pm

- 3:25 pm

In-person

Trauma, Dissociation, and the Brain: Toward the Restoration of the Self

Ruth Lanius

This presentation will discuss treatment challenges frequently encountered in trauma treatment. Therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the self through the resolution of key symptoms and barriers to treatment will be described. Specifically, an integrative
approach drawing on techniques such as EMDR, CBT, DBT, sensorimotor psychotherapy, neurofeedback, and internal family systems therapy will be demonstrated throughout the keynote. Finally, the lecture will discuss brain adaptations frequently observed in the aftermath of trauma.

Tuesday 14th June

3:25 pm

- 3:40 pm

Q & A Session with Ruth Lanius

Tuesday 14th June

3:40 pm

- 4:00 pm

Break - Tea, Coffee and Conversations with delegates and exhibitors

Tuesday 14th June

4:00 pm

- 5:15 pm

Live Stream

The Impact of Trauma and Neglect on the Developing Child

Bruce D. Perry

Presentation Objectives:
1. Understand the effects of trauma and neglect from a neurodevelopmental perspective.
2. Identify signs and symptoms of trauma and neglect in young children.
3. Learn new strategies for care, program development and policy as related to developmental trauma.
The development of a young child is profoundly influenced by experiences. Experiences – good and bad – shape the organization of the brain which ultimately impacts emotional, social, cognitive and physiological functioning. Insights into this process come from understanding brain development. Trauma and neglect, which is the absence of essential developmental experiences required to express the fundamental potential of a child, are both pervasive problems in our culture. Similarly, chaos, threat and abnormal patterns of emotional, social, cognitive and physical interactions with young children lead to an array of brain-related problems with life-long implications for mental and physical health. This presentation will review clinical work and research that can help us better experience and then suggest new directions for clinical practice, program development and policy

Tuesday 14th June

5:15 pm

- 5:30 pm

Live Stream

Q & A Session with Bruce Perry

Tuesday 14th June

5:30 pm

Conference Finish